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How to Use the MedCheck Lab Test for Your Patients Best Outcome

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How to Use the MedCheck Lab Test for Your Patients Best Outcome

All medications that enter the body undergo complex processes described by the acronym ADME, which stands for absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion.

Absorption is how the medication enters the body; Distribution is how it moves around the body; Metabolism is how it is changed within the body, often in the liver; Elimination is how it leaves the body.

These ADME processes vary from person to person, based partly on an individual's genetic makeup. For instance, some people have a genetic makeup that causes them to poorly metabolize (break down) a drug, leading to more side effects because the drug accumulates in the body. On the other hand, some people have a genetic makeup that causes them to rapidly metabolize (break down) a drug, lessening the drug's intended effects.

The Medcheck Lab Test by dnalife evaluates these genetic differences. It provides "detailed guidelines of gene-drug interactions, while highlighting potential side effects, increased toxicity, and lack of efficacy," allowing healthcare providers to choose medications that are most likely to be beneficial while minimizing adverse reactions.  

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What is The Medcheck Test by dnalife?

A blood spot sample is needed for the Medcheck test. Patients can collect the sample in the convenience of their homes.

The test is beneficial for patients who are:

  • Not responding to a current medication
  • Planning to start a new medication
  • Experiencing medication side effects
  • Requiring doses outside of the recommended range

The test evaluates sixty-two gene variants within twenty-one genes that encode enzymes essential for drug metabolism.

The report provides "accurate and actionable recommendations" for about two hundred drugs that treat various conditions, including psychiatric disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and pain.  

What is the Clinical value of The Medcheck Test by dnalife?

The CDC estimates that genetic information about drug metabolism is known and actionable for about 18% of all prescriptions written in the US.

The clinical utility of the Medcheck test is that it gives healthcare providers information about drug metabolism tailored to their patient's genetic profile. This individualized information can ultimately:

  • Highlight potential side effects of a medication
  • Minimize medication toxicity
  • Minimize the use of ineffective medications
  • Improve medication efficacy

The Medcheck test evaluates many common medication classes, including:

Cardiovascular

  • ARBs
  • Antiarrhythmics
  • Anticoagulants
  • Antiplatelets
  • Beta-blockers
  • Diuretics
  • Statins

Diabetes

  • Meglitinides
  • Sulfonylureas

Gastrointestinal

Infections

  • Antifungals
  • Anti-HIV
  • Antimalarial

Pain

Psychiatry

  • ADHD
  • Antidepressants
  • Antipsychotics
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Lithium

Rheumatology

  • DMARDs
  • Methotrexate
  • Sulfasalazine

What Does the Report Provide?

The report is divided into several sections, including:

Current Patient Medications

This section gives a synopsis of the risks and recommendations of the patient's current medications.

  • A green checkmark beside the medication indicates that "the medication can be prescribed according to standard regimens or the patient's risk for the indicated condition is not increased."
  • A yellow hazard sign indicates that "guidelines exist for adjusting dosage, increased vigilance, or the patient has a moderate risk for the indicated condition."
  • A red X indicates that "a medication has potentially reduced efficacy, increased toxicity, or the patient has an increased risk for the indicated condition."

Risk Management

This section gives a summary of medical conditions that the patient is at significant risk of, should be monitored for, or is at low risk of. For example, based on genetic makeup, a patient may have a moderate risk for tardive dyskinesia if treated with an antipsychotic; the patient should be monitored for signs of tardive dyskinesia.

Potentially Impacted Medications

This section gives an easy-to-follow, color-coded table listing medications by class:

  • Medications in the green column can be prescribed with standard precautions
  • Medications in the yellow column should be used with caution
  • Medications in the red column should be avoided if alternatives are available

Dosing Guidance

This section provides specific information on all medications that have an increased risk. Explanations, dosing suggestions, and medication alternative are provided

Test Details

This section describes all genetic markers that were evaluated. It provides the gene name, the patient's genotype, a phenotype description, and explains the clinical consequences of the genetic makeup.

Patient Information Card

This section provides a summary genetic report that patients can cut out and share with healthcare providers:

Summary

The Medcheck test helps predict individual responses to specific medications based on genes associated with drug metabolism. This knowledge helps healthcare providers choose the safest and most effective medications from many different drug classes.

The Medcheck test has the potential to:

  1. Reduce adverse drug reactions
  2. Improve treatment efficacy
  3. Avoid ineffective treatments
  4. Minimize drug dose adjustments

It's always best to consult with a healthcare professional or a genetic counselor to discuss the potential benefits and risks of any genetic testing and to determine whether it is appropriate for you based on your personal and family medical history.

The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always consult with your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider before taking any dietary supplement or making any changes to your diet or exercise routine.
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